News

0722, 2016

A peek into summer internships

By Tufts University |July 22, 2016

A couple of summers ago, I was lucky to be able to share a list of students’ blogs and for-public-consumption Twitter feeds (not all still active) that a student had collected.  I tried to accomplish the same thing this year, but, alas, did not persevere enough to accumulate much of a list.  Still, I’d […]

0722, 2016

JFK Peace Corps Legacy

By Harvard |July 22, 2016

I visited the University of Michigan campus recently for a Graduate Horizons Conference and I posted a few photos to our Twitter account (@hksadmissions), but I thought I would also post the pictures here. 

It could be said that the birth of the Peace Corps took place at the University of Michigan on October 14, 1960. While campaigning for President, JFK visited the University and the following is a portion of his speech, given on the steps of the Michigan Union – 

I want to express my thanks to you, as a graduate of the Michigan of the East, Harvard University.

I come here tonight delighted to have the opportunity to say one or two words about this campaign that is coming into the last three weeks.

How many of you who are going to be doctors, are willing to spend your days in Ghana? Technicians or engineers, how many of you are willing to work in the Foreign Service and spend your lives traveling around the world? On your willingness to do that, not merely to serve one year or two years in the service, but on your willingness to contribute part of your life to this country, I think will depend the answer whether a free society can compete. I think it can! And I think Americans are willing to contribute. But the effort must be far greater than we have ever made in the past.

We ran a blog entry on the creation of the Peace Corps last fall

On the step where JFK gave his speech is this plaque.

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Across the street is a sign board with more information about the speech –

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As well as another plaque. 

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If you are ever in Ann Arbor, I recommend strolling down South State Street and viewing the reminders, which are located on opposite sides of the street.

0721, 2016

Servicemen as Students: Active Duty Military at the Woodrow Wilson School

By Princeton University |July 21, 2016

Servicemen as Students: Active Duty Military at the Woodrow Wilson School

Jul 22, 2016

Candidates for Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs usually enter the School’s degree programs with real-world professional experience. Students with military backgrounds also bring a global viewpoint of the effect public policy has on the ground. Their leadership and experience in the field enriches classroom conversations. Full Story Here.

0721, 2016

Politics & Polls #4: How the RNC is ‘Unconventional’

By Princeton University |July 21, 2016

Politics & Polls #4: How the RNC is ‘Unconventional’

Jul 21, 2016
Voter Button & WooCast Logo
It’s been an interesting week at the Republication National Convention in Cleveland. Donald Trump’s wife Melania was accused of plagiarizing her speech. Ted Cruz was booed offstage after failing to endorse Trump. And Hillary Clinton was called a “criminal” and compared to “Lucifer.”
 
Will such dramatic incidents have an impact on voters? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this issue and more in episode four of Politics & Polls. Full Podcast Here.
0721, 2016

2016 Summer Student Series – Post #7: Yoko Okura, MPP 2017

By Harvard |July 21, 2016

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Greetings from Kathmandu! I am currently interning at the
emergency unit of UNICEF Nepal. In April 2015, Nepal made headlines worldwide when
a devastating earthquake struck the country, taking 9000 lives and affecting 8
million. Children, especially
vulnerable to disasters, accounted for 30% of the deaths. 700,000 houses and
35,000 classrooms were destroyed, and many children continue to learn in
temporary shelters over a year after the earthquake. In addition to the
ongoing earthquake recovery efforts, UNICEF Nepal provides significant work to
a country also prone to other natural disasters such as droughts, fires, floods,
and landslides; such disasters on average affect 335,000 people and kill 1,000
annually.

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Daledhura district (western Nepal)

What am I doing?

My main responsibilities are to monitor the child-centered
community and school-based disaster risk reduction programs UNICEF Nepal is currently
implementing in communities around the country. Most recently, I was tasked to craft
a report documenting the process and measuring the outcomes of these programs. During
my internship, I have travelled to three different districts across Nepal to
conduct stakeholder interviews with community leaders, local government
officials, members of children clubs and women’s clubs, teachers, students, and
parents on the impact of these programs since their implementation in 2014. The
interviews have identified both positive outcomes and challenges to UNICEF’s disaster
risk reduction programs. For example, I learned that stakeholders in all
districts were unanimous in their support for creating a seasonal hazard
calendar to raise community awareness to prepare for a disaster. In addition, I
was surprised to learn that even in flood-prone areas, schools did not have
evacuation plans prior to the implementation of UNICEF’s programs. Currently, I
am compiling all of my learnings and best practices into a report so that these
invaluable lessons are ensured as the programs are scaled to other districts.

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Interviewing Gender Based Violence Watch Groups in Saptari

Why is the internship
important?

My internship at UNICEF Nepal has served as an opportunity
to put my year of invaluable training in econometrics, leadership, management,
negotiations, and statistics to use in a real-life and impactful setting. After
working in Nepal for a month, I find that the lessons and skills I have learned
from my HKS classes have strengthened both my analytical judgement and interpersonal
skills. Working in the UNICEF Nepal office, where my colleagues come from all
over the world, you need to present your work persuasively with evidence, but
also communicate effectively. I strongly believe the rigorous Kennedy School
coursework, combined with the diversity of my classmates and the myriad of perspectives
I have had the pleasure of interacting with, prepared me well for my
internship.

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With teachers at Dohti district

How did HKS help me?

The Office of Career Advancement (OCA) at HKS provided me
with tremendous support in securing this internship. My counselor, Judith
Coquillette, not only helped me with my application, but also introduced me to
a recent HKS graduate who had interned in a similar capacity with and secured a
position at UNICEF after graduation. The alumnus gave me invaluable advice on
the interview process and also met with me at UNICEF headquarters to share his insights
on working with UNICEF.

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Sapatri district (southern Nepal)

 ***************

Yoko Okura is a second-year Master’s in Public Policy
candidate and a Fulbright Scholar from Japan. Prior to HKS, she worked as a
news producer and reporter at TV Asahi. Most recently, Yoko served as the lead
correspondent covering the Abe administration’s agricultural reform policy. Her
extensive coverage on the recovery process of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and
tsunami has led to her passion in improving disaster recovery efforts around
the world.

Series Links

Post #1 – Jessica Kahlenberg, MPP 2017
Post #2 – Ranjavati Banerji, MPA2 2017
Post #3 – Hiram Rios Hernandez, MPP 2017
Post #4 – Farrah Andersen, MPP 2017
Post #5 – Udai Chopra, MPA2/MBA 2017
Post #6 – Lindsey O’Connell, MPP 2017

0720, 2016

Summer Information Session with the Walsh School of Foreign Service

By Georgetown University |July 20, 2016

Please join us on Thursday, July 21 at 6:00 p.m. for a speaker event and open house for SFS Graduate Degree Programs. The event will commence with a brief presentation on the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service by Professor Tony Arend, Director of the Master of Science in Foreign Service and Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Graduate Affairs within the SFS. Attendees will also hear about application guidelines and recommendations from a panel of Admissions Officers and have the opportunity to speak with representatives from the eight degree programs.

0720, 2016

Ford School partners with INCAE Business School in Latin America

By University of Michigan |July 20, 2016

The University of Michigan will launch a new partnership that enables MBA students from one of Latin America’s top business schools to earn a master of public administration degree at the Ford School of Public Policy.

0720, 2016

Jaclaine Mercado ’10 MAIR is now HR Specialist for the Green Climate Fund

By Syracuse University |July 20, 2016

Jaclaine Mercado is now the HR Specialist for the Green Climate Fund in Incheon, South Korea. She is responsible for maintaining external communications with the company’s recruitment partners, manages recruitment process and assists with new staff member orientations. The Green Climate Fund, which reports to the United Nations, was established to promote the reduction of […]

0720, 2016

2017 Application Long-Term Planning Series – Post #6

By Harvard |July 20, 2016

Following instructions
is an important part of the application process and I will admit, the HKS
application instructions are long and detailed. Even though the application
will not be available until September, I thought it would be a good idea to
cover some of the frequently asked questions surrounding application
instructions and requirements in this long-term planning series.

Academic transcripts are an important part of our holistic
review process and it is never too early to start compiling your transcript
information. 

Jamie Bergstein from our office has composed the
following helpful entry on transcript information.

Transcripts 101

Every year we get many
questions regarding transcripts. I am hoping this blog post cuts down on
confusion and processing time for you and our office.

What do I need to submit?

Applicants are
required to scan and upload transcripts for all colleges and universities
attended. This requirement includes institutions where courses have been taken
but no degree was received. Transcripts must include the following:

  • all courses attended and grades received
  • proof of degree conferral
  • date of degree conferral
  • grading policy and scale

Domestic transcripts
will have this information listed on the transcript 99.9% of the time. This
information may vary on international transcripts. Proof of degree conferral is
usually a separate document – please make sure to request this information in
addition to your transcript. If our office finds we need more information, we
will contact you.

If you received a degree from an institution but it is not
explicitly stated on your transcript that you received a degree, you will need
to request separate documentation from your university. Please note the wording
graduated
or “completed
does not fulfill this requirement. The document should state the degree you
received and date you received your degree.

Applicants who participated in the Public Policy and
International Affairs Fellowship Program 
(PPIA) must upload a copy of their program
evaluation. This is a separate question on the application; you do not need to
enter this information in the education section of the application.

You do not need to provide
transcripts for professional training, executive education, language programs,
secondary schools, Gymnasiums, lycées, or certificate programs that did not
result in university/college credit. Please do not list these programs on the
application form.

What if I transferred
universities or participated in a study abroad program?

Separate transcripts
are required for study abroad programs and/or transfer classes if the home
institution does not report grades, courses, and dates of attendance. Many
transcripts only list that credit was received to your home institution. We
will need to see the specific courses and grades received for these classes.

Non-English Transcripts

Transcripts and diplomas in languages other than English must be translated by the issuing
institution or a certified translation service. We need to receive both the
untranslated and translated version of these documents. Our office does not
have a preferred translation service, but we often recommend Harvard Student Agencies’
translation service
 and World Education Services as two options.

What if I am currently enrolled
in classes or a degree program?

If you are currently enrolled in classes and/or a degree granting
program, we need proof of enrollment that includes a list of your current classes. We do
not need to see grades if they are not available, but we will need to see
classes.

Important note on official
documents:
 For your
convenience and expedited processing, we allow applicants to submit unofficial
copies of their transcripts. If you are admitted and choose to attend Harvard
Kennedy School, you must provide official copies of your transcripts and degree
conferrals (if a degree was received). You must have the issuing institution
send the transcript, degree conferral, and translation (if necessary) directly
to HKS in a signed and sealed envelope. If you enroll and do not submit
your official documents by the deadline provided in your admissions letter, you
will be unable to enroll in classes until we receive all of your official
documents. Please keep this in mind as you prepare your application, as it
may be in your best interest to submit official documents by the application
deadline.

Series Links

Post #1 – Series Introduction
Post #2 – Pause Points
Post #3 – Letters of Recommendation Advice – Planning
Post #4 – Choosing Letter of Recommendation Writers
Post #5 – Email Address Advice

0719, 2016

Semester-like atmosphere in the building

By Tufts University |July 19, 2016

We’re more than halfway through the summer stretch between Commencement and Orientation and this week has been noteworthy for a sudden flurry of semester-like activity!  Well, maybe that’s an exaggeration, but there are two groups of students passing this way and that through the Hall of Flags.  The first is the GMAP class of […]

0719, 2016

2016 Summer Student Series – Post #6: Lindsey O’Connell, MPP 2017

By Harvard |July 19, 2016

After graduating from Georgetown University in
2009 with a degree in Government and no clue what I wanted to do with my life,
I moved to South Korea to teach English and travel around.  When I moved back to the States, I spent
three years working for a community sailing organization in Boston that
provided after school and summer programming for kids around sailing, science,
and the environment. I really believed in the mission, but as a glorified
jack-of-all-trades running around literally putting out fires on the pier, I
knew I wanted to pursue something more analytical. I spent the next few years
trying on various work opportunities for size and ultimately landed back in
grad school.

In short, I have been a professional dilettante.

I mention all of this because it took this
professional dilettante-ism—as a teacher, at a nonprofit, on a campaign, at a
technology company, doing research in the private sector—to help me realize my
passion. Working with a youth development organization provided my work with
meaning while conducting research and writing reports challenged me
intellectually: now I’m working to combine my passions in education policy,
nonprofit programming, and evaluation.  

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DC Data Summit 2016

It is for this reason that I applied to the Urban
Leaders Fellowship, a program designed to develop young leaders who understand
policy design and practice. The fellowship places people like me in one of eight
cities across the US with a group of like-minded individuals who together work
on a policy project for an elected official, and separately tackle projects at
various partner organizations across their respective cities. Additionally, as
one fellow among many, I’m privy to a variety of guest speakers, networking
events, alumni events, and professional development sessions.

I’m housed in Washington, DC, where I spend half
of my day in the Deputy Mayor for Education office. There, I’m working
alongside two other fellows to address a recent resolution passed by the State
Board of Education allowing high schools to pursue waivers in assigning
competency-based credits to students. Ideally, competency-based education
allows students to demonstrate mastery of a skill or standard through a variety
of assessments, rather than being forced to sit in class for 120 hours—the
typical measure of credit earning for the last 100 years. Our team is
particularly focused on how to align digital badges, or credentials students
can earn outside of school to indicate mastery of a skill, with earning school
credits. We are conducting research on best practices across the country and
interviewing stakeholders from schools, community organizations, and government
agencies in order to make recommendations for CBE integration.

Meanwhile, I spend my mornings at Horton’s Kids,
a wraparound community resource center serving families in DC’s poorest ward.
I’m providing extra capacity to the education and youth development teams to
refine a participant survey, build a risk index for students, and brainstorm a
broader plan for data and evaluation including these new tools and grant
requirements.

If you recall my a-ha moment from earlier in this
post, about education, out of school time programs, and policy evaluation, you
can clearly see how aligned this fellowship is with where I want to go in the
future. I get to provide evaluation assistance to a nonprofit, while I’m
simultaneously positioned to research one of the more innovative aspects of
education reform involving graduation requirements, college readiness, career
readiness, and cross-sector collaboration. I’m grateful for the opportunity to
apply the skills I learned last year—from memo writing, to policy analysis
frameworks—to my work this summer, even as my work prepares me for the job I
want next.

 ***************

Lindsey is heading into her second year of the
MPP program having spent the first year learning about education reform
policies and program evaluation techniques. Last fall, Lindsey worked on a
student advisory committee to support the Boston Basics program. In the spring,
Lindsey volunteered on the executive committee to plan the annual Youth
Leadership Conference for greater-Boston area high school students at HKS.
Prior to grad school, Lindsey
worked as a research associate for a financial
services advisory firm in Boston, researching and writing reports on healthcare
trends. In 2013, she worked as an organizer and GOTV coordinator for a senate
campaign. From 2011 to 2013, she worked as the business manager of a nonprofit
community sailing center in Boston. Before that, Lindsey spent her first year
out of college teaching English as a second language to primary and secondary
school students in an academy in South Korea. She holds a degree in Government
from Georgetown University. 

Series Links

Post #1 – Jessica Kahlenberg, MPP 2017
Post #2 – Ranjavati Banerji, MPA2 2017
Post #3 – Hiram Rios Hernandez, MPP 2017
Post #4 – Farrah Andersen, MPP 2017
Post #5 – 

Udai Chopra, MPA2/MBA 2017

0719, 2016

Turquía: entre la muerte y la malaria

By IE University |July 19, 2016

Deniz Torcu es economista y máster en Estudios de la UE y en Relaciones internacionales 19.07.2016 El intento de golpe de Estado en la noche del viernes 15 de julio ha sido una sorpresa tanto para Turquía como para la comunidad internacional. A pesar de haber sobrevivido a una historia llena con golpes de Estado […]

0719, 2016

Fall 2016 New Student Series Part 6: Manasi Akhilesh Nanavati

By Columbia University |July 19, 2016

In our sixth edition of the e-introductions, meet Manasi Akhilesh Nanavati. Manasi loves to dance, wants to one day produce a television series about society’s role in development issues and social evolution, and most looks forward to “making it in New York.” Welcome Manasi! You’ll do great here. Full Name: Manasi Akhilesh Nanavati Age: 28 Degree […]

0718, 2016

Fumi and Ryota

By Tufts University |July 18, 2016

Fletcher couples are just the best.  I can’t keep up with all of them, but I love when I’m lucky enough to hear about their weddings.  Recently, Liz told me about a newly married MIB couple.  Fumi, F16, and Ryota, F15, met during her first year and his second year in the program.  […]

0717, 2016

2016 Summer Student Series – Post #5: Udai Chopra, MPA/MBA 2017

By Harvard |July 17, 2016

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This summer, I am thrilled to be
interning in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia with Schulze Global Investments, a frontier
markets private equity firm. Schulze Global has been a trailblazer for private
equity in Ethiopia, first opening an office in Addis Ababa in 2008, and raising
its Ethiopia Growth and Transformation Fund in 2014. The Fund is focused on
growth equity investment opportunities within Ethiopia, and it currently
comprises a portfolio of seven assets across a variety of sectors, including building
materials, FMCG, education and healthcare.

While I only worked in Australia
and the United States prior to this summer, I have had an avid interest in economic
growth and development in emerging countries. My family roots are in India, and
with each trip back to visit my family, my desire to pivot into an
international development-related career path grew more strongly. This
aspiration was the impetus behind my pursuit of the joint MPA / MBA at Harvard
Kennedy School and The Wharton School.

Following my first year at
Wharton, I did a summer internship with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s
Agricultural Development team in Seattle. As my first foray into international
development, the experience was incredibly enriching. I worked closely with
grantees and other stakeholders involved with the dissemination of information
to smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. The internship
also provided me with exposure to a number of highly experienced practitioners
across the Foundation, as well as inspirational guest speakers, from whom I
received invaluable advice about shaping my career and maximizing my impact in
international development. My realizations were twofold – firstly, I should
gain first-hand experience in emerging countries; and secondly, I should
continue to focus on my strengths and experience in the finance industry.

This newfound clarity from my
internship experience gave me a sense of purpose and direction as I entered into
my first semester of the MPA program at Harvard Kennedy School in the Fall of
2015. I sought to navigate the myriad JFK Forum events, guest speakers,
professor lunches, and student caucus activities, (not to mention classes!), to
enhance my understanding of the building blocks of international development,
gain deeper insights into the political and economic landscapes across
Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, and further my personal development.

Quite frankly, the resources and
touchpoints that I could draw upon at HKS were unbelievable. There is a genuine
desire across the faculty to enhance students’ learning and development, encouraging
us to seek personal advice outside of class. I took away many life lessons from
meeting or dining with professors Larry Summers, Ricardo Hausmann, Isabel Guerrero
and Michael Ignatieff. Particularly illuminating for me were several one-on-one
discussions with Dr Donald Kaberuka, former president of the African
Development Bank, who was at HKS as Hauser Leader-in-Residence during 2015-16. Through
our conversations, I began to better understand the importance of the private
sector, alongside the government and non-profit sectors, as an engine for
economic growth and development in emerging countries. In particular, I learned
that the African Development Bank is a limited partner (investor) in a number
of private equity funds across the continent, helping me recognize the power of
private equity to drive capital formation in key sectors, create jobs and
stimulate economic growth. This gave me strong motivation to seek an internship
opportunity within private equity in Africa.

Fast forward to today, and I am eight
weeks into my ten-week internship with Schulze Global. My experience has been an
all-encompassing and transformative one. I have been fully immersed within the
team from day one, given responsibilities spanning both oversight of existing
portfolio assets, as well as due diligence of new potential investment
opportunities. In relation to the former, my experience has been hands-on, involving
visiting our portfolio companies’ offices and operations, and working with
management teams to identify opportunities for driving growth and operational efficiency.
In relation to the latter, meeting with business owners and seeing their companies’
operations first-hand has been fascinating. As implied by the name of our Ethiopian
Growth and Transformation Fund, we have a sense of responsibility through our
investments to contribute to the advancement of the Ethiopian economy and creation
of opportunities for the Ethiopian people. This objective is reinforced by our
pursuit of double bottom line goals, alongside financial return goals,
emphasizing the importance of economic, social and environmental outcomes as
part of our investment evaluation process.

Understanding the broader
Ethiopian macroeconomic and regulatory environment is also critical to
assessing the viability and potential of new investment opportunities. Ethiopia
is one of the fastest growing countries in the world, insulated from the
commodity and currency-related challenges that have afflicted a number of other
countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. While the recent drought has dampened growth
expectations for 2016, the country’s exciting growth potential is embodied in its
young, vibrant population, rapid urbanization, significant investment in
infrastructure, and widespread construction activity.

The importance of meeting people
and building relationships in Ethiopia cannot be underestimated. Through introductions,
meetings, events and alumni networks, I have been very fortunate to learn more
about how businesses and the economy operates from many different perspectives.
On one such occasion, the Australian Ambassador to Ethiopia, South Sudan, Djibouti
and Central African Republic kindly hosted a lunch for a group of interns in
Addis Ababa, along with representatives from the United States and South Korean
embassies in Ethiopia, to share our perspectives and ideas.

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Interns in Addis Ababa, hosted by the Australian Ambassador to Ethiopia,
South Sudan, Djibouti and Central African Republic, and accompanied by
representatives from the United States and South Korean embassies in Ethiopia.

Embracing the local culture has
also enriched my experience significantly. I have enjoyed meals of injera with
shiro or tibs; been enthralled by traditional music and dancing (and
occasionally convinced to join in!); and developed a coffee addiction! Gaining
a full appreciation of the inimitable diversity and beauty of Ethiopia requires
extensive travel, and I have fortunately been surrounded by a great group of
fellow interns and friends who share a similar passion for exploring the
country. So far, we have visited the rock-hewn churches in Lalibela, scaled
sheer cliff faces in Gheralta, and hiked down to the Wenchi Crater Lake. And
yet there is so much more to explore!

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Visiting the rock-hewn churches in Lalibela.

While I am sad that my time in
Ethiopia is passing by so quickly, I am extremely grateful for the hospitality
and warmth of my team and everyone else who has been part of my experience this
summer. The learning opportunities have been incredible, and the many fond
memories I have of my time here will no doubt compel me to come back very soon!

 ***************

Udai Chopra is a joint MPA / MBA
candidate at Harvard Kennedy School and The Wharton School, having completed
his second year of the three-year program.

Prior to commencing his graduate
studies, Udai was an investment banker for seven years. He worked closely with
private equity and mid-market clients in Australia and New Zealand, executing M&A,
leveraged finance and equity capital market transactions. During his previous
summer in 2015, Udai did an internship with the Bill & Melinda Gates
Foundation in Seattle, working in the Agricultural Development team with a
focus on Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. He holds a Bachelor of Laws and
Bachelor of Commerce (Finance) from the University of New South Wales.

Series Links

Post #1 – Jessica Kahlenberg, MPP 2017
Post #2 – Ranjavati Banerji, MPA2 2017
Post #3 – Hiram Rios Hernandez, MPP 2017
Post #4 – Farrah Andersen, MPP 2017

0715, 2016

Politics & Polls #3: Is the Election a Referendum?

By Princeton University |July 15, 2016

Politics & Polls #3: Is the Election a Referendum?

Jul 18, 2016
Picture of President Obama and WooCast Logo
People often vote based on who’s already in the White House. So how does the incumbent party affect elections? And how is President Obama’s legacy influencing the current campaign? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this issue and more in episode three of Politics & Polls. Full Podcast Here.
0715, 2016

First-Year Alumni: Dallin finds his new career path

By Tufts University |July 15, 2016

Unless an additional report surprises me by popping into my inbox, today we’ll close out the updates from the Class of 2015.  The final word comes from Dallin Van Leuven, whose post-Fletcher job didn’t appear immediately after graduation, but was the right opportunity when it did arrive.

Greetings from Beirut!

The year following my […]

0715, 2016

Teena Curry ’07 MPA is now Grants Management Specialist for the Corporation for National and Community Service

By Syracuse University |July 15, 2016

Teena Curry is now a Grants Management Specialist for the Corporation for National and Community Service in Washington, DC. She is responsible for assisting with, tracking, and analyzing audit-related issues. The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that funds national programs, such as AmeriCorps, and works with local partners to benefit local communities […]

0715, 2016

Fall 2016 New Student Series Part 5: Mohamed Zeeshan Razeek

By Columbia University |July 15, 2016

In our fifth edition of the e-introductions, meet Mohamed. He studied mechanical engineering at VIT University, but has transitioned to writing about Indian foreign policy and international affairs for publications like The Diplomat and The Huffington Post. He hopes to gain some practical experience with the United Nations and return to India to become a policymaker. In his free […]

0714, 2016

David Van Slyke Named Dean of The Maxwell School

By Syracuse University |July 14, 2016

David Van Slyke was named Dean of The Maxwell School in June 2016.

0714, 2016

First-Year Alumni: Diane resumes telling her story

By Tufts University |July 14, 2016

One of the opportunities I most value about my job is following students from their application phase, through their time at Fletcher, and then on to their post-Fletcher life.  A good example would be my connection with Diane Broinshtein, whom I first met when I was her application interviewer back in August 2012.  Then, […]

0714, 2016

First-Year Alumni: Diane resumes telling her story

By Tufts University |July 14, 2016

One of the opportunities I most value about my job is following students from their application phase, through their time at Fletcher, and then on to their post-Fletcher life.  A good example would be my connection with Diane Broinshtein, whom I first met when I was her application interviewer back in August 2012.  Then, […]

0714, 2016

First-Year Alumni: Diane resumes telling her story

By Tufts University |July 14, 2016

One of the opportunities I most value about my job is following students from their application phase, through their time at Fletcher, and then on to their post-Fletcher life.  A good example would be my connection with Diane Broinshtein, whom I first met when I was her application interviewer back in August 2012.  Then, […]

0713, 2016

SIS Alumni Relations Office receives award for career development program

By American University |July 13, 2016

The SIS Alumni Relations Office at the School of International Service (SIS) has received a CASE Gold award from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) for an innovative new program that allows students to tap into the valuable global alumni network.

0713, 2016

Politics & Polls #2: Does the VP Pick Still Matter?

By Princeton University |July 13, 2016

Politics & Polls #2: Does the VP Pick Still Matter?

Jul 13, 2016
Election podcast

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will soon announce their running mates—but does the vice president pick still matter? While it was once used as a way to bring regional balance to the ticket, it’s not clear what the vice president selection means in 2016.

Tune in to the second episode of Politics & Polls as Professors Julian E. Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this issue and more. Full Podcast Here.

0713, 2016

Politics & Polls #2: Does the VP Pick Still Matter?

By Princeton University |July 13, 2016

Politics & Polls #2: Does the VP Pick Still Matter?

Jul 13, 2016
Election podcast

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will soon announce their running mates—but does the vice president pick still matter? While it was once used as a way to bring regional balance to the ticket, it’s not clear what the vice president selection means in 2016.

Tune in to the second episode of Politics & Polls as Professors Julian E. Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this issue and more. Full Podcast Here.

0713, 2016

Yale student selected for Rosenthal Fellowship in International Relations

By Yale University |July 13, 2016

Andrew Watrous, a first-year MA student at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, has been selected to receive the Harold W. Rosenthal Fellowship in International Relations.

The fellowship provides graduate students the opportunity to spend a summer working on international relations in the U.S. government Executive Branch or the U.S. Congress.

0713, 2016

2016 Recruitment Travel – Post #10

By Harvard |July 13, 2016

We continue to add new opportunities for prospective applicants to meet face-to-face with representatives of HKS. To see both where we have visited this year and where sessions will be held in the future, visit our recruitment calendar.

São Paulo, Brazil – July 13, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Amman, Jordan – July 15, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Jakarta, Indonesia – July 15, 2016, click here to register

Bangkok, Thailand – July 16, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Paris, France – July 16, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Yangon, Myanmar – July 16, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Taipei, Taiwan – July 19, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – July 20, 2016, click here to register (student-led event)

Caracas, Venezuela – July 20, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Mexico City, Mexico – July 20, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Nairobi, Kenya – July 20, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Tirana, Albania – July 20, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Bogotá, Colombia – July 21, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Monrovia, Liberia – July 21, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

San Francisco, California – July 21, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania – July 23, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Orlando, Florida – July 24, 2016, click here to register

Kigali, Rwanda – July 25, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Bogotá, Colombia – July 28, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Brussels, Belgium – July 28, 2016, click here to register (student led-session)

Athens, Greece – July 29, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Sacramento, California – July 29, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Seoul, South Korea – July 29, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia – August 2, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia – August 3, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

New York City, NY – August 4, 2016 – Joint Programs Session with HBS and HLS, click here to register

Menlo Park, California – August 10, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

Portland, Oregon – August 13, 2016, click here to register (student-led session)

We will have five public information sessions in Washington, D.C. and links for all sessions are below. 

Registration Links for Public Events in D.C. are as Follows

0713, 2016

5 ways to get around Columbia University

By Columbia University |July 13, 2016

Figuring out transportation can be one of the most intimidating aspects of visiting a new city. New York City has one of the most streamlined, yet oftentimes complicated transportation systems in the country (and possibly the world). New Yorkers love the convenience of the subway system, but hate the complications that a soggy or snowy day […]

0712, 2016

Environment Panel, tonight

By Tufts University |July 12, 2016

Even as I noted yesterday how quiet it is at Fletcher this month, there are a few things going on around here.  First, there’s a group of diplomats on campus for a short-term executive program.  And second, there’s a panel in ASEAN Auditorium this evening on women in the environment field.  The panel will […]